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Depth of field

The range of distances from the camera at which objects appear to be in focus (rather than blurry and out-of-focus). Typically large f-stop numbers (which equate to smaller aperture diameters) result in larger depths of field. Usually lower zoom (equivalent to shorter focal lengths) also results in a greater depth of field.

Wikipedia definition of `depth-of-field'

Understanding Depth of Field -- online tutorial

slipe (Steve's digicam, Panasonic forum, 16 March 2004)...

Prosumer digital cameras don't have the f32 of some film SLRs and many don't go past f8. You or the camera can alter both the ISO and shutter speed to make that useable. DOF {depth of field} is much larger for a given f stop because of the sensor size. f2.8 on a digital with that small a sensor probably gives the DOF of f8 on a 35mm. The problem is usually blurring the background rather than getting enough DOF. {You can simulate a `fake' shallow depths of field by blurring the background with image manipulation software. See [*]}
Depth of field and digital cameras -- further explanation of why the majority of non-SLR digital cameras have large depths of field compared to 35 mm film cameras.

Depth-of-field calculator -- Lens multiplier factor of the FZ10 is 5.83. The lens multiplier factor is sometimes called the `crop factor'. The range of the FZ10's focal length (in 35 mm equivalents) is 35 mm to 420 mm. The range of `real' focal lengths is 6 mm to 72 mm. A graphical calculator is provided by Nick Sushkin.



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next up previous index Link to 'photography' page
Next: Using depth of field Up: Terms and definitions Previous: Single lens reflex (SLR)   Index
David Fong 2009-09-04